Growth & Development

Language Development

Normal Development:

  • Can recognize their caregiver’s voice and prefers that voice over others (0–4 months.)
  • Starts to make open-mouthed and vowel sounds (for example, “ooh” and “aah”) (0–4 months.)
  • Begins to add some consonant sounds (for example, “baa” and “goo” and “ma”) (5–7 months.)
  • Can imitate some sounds (1–4 months.)
  • Turns  head towards a familiar voice (2–4 months.)
  • Begins lip reading (2–8 months.)
  • Expresses needs and feelings through sounds and cries (3–8 months.)
  • Uses sounds to communicate pleasure and displeasure (4–7 months.)

 

What You Can Do:

  • Have back and forth conversations (give your baby plenty of time to respond.)
  • Talk face-to-face and get close!
  • Sing nursery rhymes (babies enjoy the rhythmic patterns.)
  • Sportscast! Talk to your baby about what you’re doing (for example, bathing, dressing.)
  • Encourage babbling by repeating what your baby says and adding more syllables (for example, baby says “ba” and you say “ba-ba-bottle.”)
  • Show your baby your tongue and practice simple sounds together (for example, ‘maa, daa’.)
  • When your baby makes a sound, repeat it, so they can hear their sounds.
  • Pick a word and show your baby what it means (for example, blanket.)
  • Read your baby board books (point and label as you read, name the main character after your baby.)

 

Our Advice:

  • Listen to your baby’s sounds and don’t interrupt them.
  • Talk to your baby as much as you can.
  • Limit background noise (radio, tv) so your baby can focus on one thing at a time.
  • Remember that your baby is still very young—try not to expect him to be able to do things beyond what’s normal for his age.
  • Remember, some babies develop faster in some areas and slower in others.

 

Try not to compare yourself to other parents, or your baby to other babies. Every family is different.

Content created in partnership with
Seedlings Group