Growth & Development

Cognitive Development

Normal Development:

  • Uses objects in ways they are normally used (for example, using a box to store things) (8–15 months)
  • Plays with objects in many different ways (shaking, banging, throwing, dropping) (8–16 months)
  • Knows the difference between themselves and other people (12–20 months)
  • Can point to their body parts (15–20 months)
  • Starts make-believe or pretend play (16–24 months)
  • May start to be interested in potty training (16–24 months)
  • Starts to learn shapes and colors (17–24 months)
  • Understands that just because they can’t see something, it doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist (for example, a marble under a blanket didn’t disappear!) (8–18 months)

 

What You Can Do:

  • Let your child play with different everyday items (plastic containers, cardboard box, socks, newspaper, cups, a hairbrush, an empty egg carton)
  • At the end of the day, talk about what activities they did and help them remember
  • Ask your child to help put away toys. Then, when they want to play with them again have your child get them from where they were put away
  • Start showing your child colors, shapes, and sizes
  • Read books your child likes over and over. When they start talking more have them help you fill in the blanks of sentences that they know well
  • Play peek-a-boo
  • Let your child  play alone (remember to still carefully watch them) and have time to relax

 

Our Advice:

  • Try not to teach your child things through memorization. That isn’t helpful at this age.
  • It’s still too early to use TV as a way for your little one to learn
  • Let your child learn about objects in their own, creative way
  • Remember that your child may not respond to you when they are focused on another activity. That is normal!

 

Try not to compare yourself to other parents, or your baby to other babies. Every family is different!

Content created in partnership with
Seedlings Group